Notes from the Farm – 7/16/18:


Purslane is often a plant thought of as a weed in your garden, and if you continue to think of it as a weed, we hope you’ll keep in mind that it is edible, and that it contains more omega-3 fatty acids than any other leafy vegetable.  Check out this information from nutrition-and-you.com:

  • Research studies show that consumption of foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke, and help prevent the development of ADHD, autism, and other developmental differences in children.
  • Purslane is an excellent source of Vitamin A, (1320 IU/100 g, provides 44% of RDA) one of the highest among green leafy vegetables. Vitamin A is a known powerful natural antioxidant and an essential vitamin for vision. it is also required to maintain healthy mucusa and skin. Consumption of natural vegetables and fruits rich in vitamin A is known to help to protect from lung and oral cavity cancers.
  • Purslane is also a rich source of vitamin C, and some B-complex vitamins like riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine and carotenoids, as well as dietary minerals, such as iron, magnesium, calcium, potassium, and manganese.
  • Furthermore, present in purslane are two types of betalain alkaloid pigments, the reddish beta-cyanins and the yellow beta-xanthins. Both pigment types are potent anti-oxidants and have been found to have anti-mutagenic properties in laboratory studies.



My own preference is to eat purslane raw in salads mixed with lettuce and dandelion greens.  However, it is widely used in Greek cooking, can be found in Mexican and Indian cuisines, can be stewed, sauteed, used in soups, curries, green juices or alone own as a side dish.


Best,
Farmer Steve and our Farmers: Alyssa, Dan, Kayla, Chloe, Jenn, Becca, Michaela


In This Week’s Distribution
Our Harvest: Broccoli or Cabbage, Carrots, Beets, Zucchini and Summer Squash, Cucumber, Lettuce, Kale, Purslane
U-Pick: Green Beans, Herbs – dill, cilantro, basil, tulsi
Fruit Option: Blueberries